french breakfast radish with a side of sashimi & japan food memories

Posted by on Feb 28, 2014 in Elsewhere | 6 Comments

It’s too hot to cook. And I’ve just harvested radishes from my garden. What’s a girl to do? The obvious answer is sashimi for dinner using my radishes as a stand in for daikon (Japanese radish). Brilliant. So embarrassingly there is no recipe due to the simplicity of this set up however the point is that you don’t need to do much to beautiful home grown produce! And if you’re after the quickest growing root vegetable of all time…plant radishes and impress your friends! I planted French Breakfast Radish (Raphanus sativus, an heirloom variety), direct sowed in the garden and they grew in just over 3 weeks! They like a sunny, well drained position and a bit of compost mixed with the soil before you sow. And no excuses, you can plant them now, autumn and spring!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to the Sashimi part. I prefer to eat my fish raw than cooked; it’s clean, fresh and as low maintenance as it gets. When I was in Japan a little over a year ago, I was on a sashimi eating warpath. The irony was I had just been working on a project over the uni semester on methylmercury in fish and the health effects of human consumption. Ah, it makes me chuckle…reliving the memories…good times! But sometimes you just gotta push methylmercury levels aside and just live a little, right? I reached ultimate sashimi nirvana at the Tokyo Fish Markets where I ate the freshest (and best) sashimi in the world for breakfast. What an awesome food memory. Japan is truly an amazing place with the food to match. I can’t wait to go back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So all you need to do is gently slice your sashimi (we eat yellow fin tuna and salmon) with a very sharp knife; against the grain and in uniform pieces (trim it in a block shape before you cut to aid this). I use a gorgeous handmade knife I bought in Tokyo to complete the authentic experience! Very thinly slice the radish, then slice again into little ribbons and put in ice cold water to freshen and separate before use (not as delicate looking as grated daikon though). So we’ll be eating our sashimi with the radish, pickled ginger, good quality japanese soy and wasabi on the side. Try and eat the radish between bites of sashimi to cleanse the palate. And don’t forget to wash it down with sake (another delight). Seriously could there be an easier summer dinner to not cook? Oishii! :: Jem x

6 Comments

  1. Gourmet Getaways
    March 14, 2014

    I love Japanese food, so healthy and fresh. Good on you for growing your own radish!

    Reply
    • lostinutensils
      March 15, 2014

      Thanks Julie. Japanese food would also have to be my favourite! I can’t take the credit for the radish…they pretty much grew themselves…at a rapid speed! 🙂

      Reply
  2. Padaek
    July 4, 2014

    Hi!

    Just scanning an older post. I think this sashimi and radish dish would be perfect now in winter too. I love the taste and look of radish – their earthiness, crunch, crispiness and slight sweet/peppery zing, and they look so pretty in their ombre tones. I noticed radish in supermarket today, and was wondering if they’re ok to grow now? I remember growing radish in Ag at high school and you’re right – they do grow quickly and it was always exciting and a treat to finally pick/eat them. I’ve been thinking about mixing them in a Lao spicy green papaya salad – I think they’ll work well. The French breakfasts look perfect and delicious. Love Japanese food too – its purity and simplicity, and it’s great to let ingredients speak for themselves. Ciao! 🙂

    Reply
    • lostinutensils
      July 5, 2014

      Absolutely! Sashimi is one of my favourite foods at any time of year. This radish is probably the best I’ve grown so far…heirloom varieties just taste better. The fact that they grow so quickly is just a bonus. It is the perfect time to grow radish at the moment. And great idea, I love the way you think…sounds delicious in a Lao green papaya salad. We might see this in one of your delicious recipes soon? I hope so 🙂

      Reply
  3. Nagi@RecipeTinEats
    February 5, 2016

    There is always something attractive about Japanese food. I believe it’s the freshness it has in every cuisine and and it’s absolutely healthy too! And wow, congratulations on growing your own radish. It looks amazing! 🙂

    Reply
    • lostinutensils
      February 5, 2016

      Japanese food is the best! No coincidence that they are the healthiest people in the world-we could learn a lot 🙂

      Reply

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